"Brain, Dance and Culture: Dance is created by the embodied brain, influenced by culture and shaped and inspired by our relationship to and our perception of the environment."
From Mason and Paul Howard’s 'Brain, Dance and Culture: The choreographer, the dancing scientist and interdisciplinary collaboration' in Brolga: An Australian Journal About Dance; Jun 2009, Issue 30, p27-34

"Brain, Dance and Culture: Dance is created by the embodied brain, influenced by culture and shaped and inspired by our relationship to and our perception of the environment."

From Mason and Paul Howard’s 'Brain, Dance and Culture: The choreographer, the dancing scientist and interdisciplinary collaboration' in Brolga: An Australian Journal About Dance; Jun 2009, Issue 30, p27-34

"The relationship between improvisation and choreography. Improvisation is represented as the downwards pointing triangle that narrows as the triangle of choreography expands. In theory, an infinite amount of movement possibilities generated through improvisation are degenerated into the finite world of a choreographed performance."
From Mason and Paul Howard’s 'Brain, Dance and Culture: The choreographer, the dancing scientist and interdisciplinary collaboration' in Brolga: An Australian Journal About Dance; Jun 2009, Issue 30, p27-34

"The relationship between improvisation and choreography. Improvisation is represented as the downwards pointing triangle that narrows as the triangle of choreography expands. In theory, an infinite amount of movement possibilities generated through improvisation are degenerated into the finite world of a choreographed performance."

From Mason and Paul Howard’s 'Brain, Dance and Culture: The choreographer, the dancing scientist and interdisciplinary collaboration' in Brolga: An Australian Journal About Dance; Jun 2009, Issue 30, p27-34

From Performance Theory by Richard Schechner (1977)

From Performance Theory by Richard Schechner (1977)

The dimensions of a dancer (2011) by Hamish MacPherson. I’m not sure I subscribe to this any more, if I ever did. I think it was more or a thinking tool and the the diagonal passage (at the two o’clock position) is an attempt to connect everything to everything.

The dimensions of a dancer (2011) by Hamish MacPherson. I’m not sure I subscribe to this any more, if I ever did. I think it was more or a thinking tool and the the diagonal passage (at the two o’clock position) is an attempt to connect everything to everything.

A choreographic score for my piece Backwardist. The arrows show possible/preferred  pathways between movement sections.

A choreographic score for my piece Backwardist. The arrows show possible/preferred  pathways between movement sections.

Not specifically about choreography but elegant and relevant - the basic elements of creativity: copy, transform, combine. Via explore-blog

Not specifically about choreography but elegant and relevant - the basic elements of creativity: copy, transform, combine. Via explore-blog

(Source: explore-blog, via hamishmacpherson)

Siobhan Davies Dance’s ROTOR, is an ensemble of performances, sound, installations and artworks. 

A new dance work by Siobhan Davies was filmed from above and its patterns created a score for the nine artists. Distinct elements of The Score triggered new work which responded not only to the images from the dance but also to the energies, counterpoints or character developed by the dancers actions.

This image from the cover of the ROTOR catalogue plots the pathways of the four dancers.

Siobhan Davies Dance’s ROTOR, is an ensemble of performances, sound, installations and artworks. 

A new dance work by Siobhan Davies was filmed from above and its patterns created a score for the nine artists. Distinct elements of The Score triggered new work which responded not only to the images from the dance but also to the energies, counterpoints or character developed by the dancers actions.

This image from the cover of the ROTOR catalogue plots the pathways of the four dancers.

Something I produced in Choreography: Experiencing Space, Time and Ideas, a workshop  Lucy Cash for the Tate and Siobhan Davies Studios, this practice-based, six-week course combined physical movement and critical thinking. 
Through the choreographic lens, we explored art works at Tate, as well as everyday life. One of the things we covered waConnecting movement to mark making and leaving behind traces, both visible and invisible. Drawing on examples from the Tate Collection and an exhibition of work by Gabriel Orozco.

Something I produced in Choreography: Experiencing Space, Time and Ideas, a workshop  Lucy Cash for the Tate and Siobhan Davies Studios, this practice-based, six-week course combined physical movement and critical thinking. 

Through the choreographic lens, we explored art works at Tate, as well as everyday life. One of the things we covered waConnecting movement to mark making and leaving behind traces, both visible and invisible. Drawing on examples from the Tate Collection and an exhibition of work by Gabriel Orozco.

I like mind-maps and think they particularly lend themselves to presenting the non-linear progression of ideas and activities in the creative process. Here is a partial picture of early research, ideas and activities for Test which I choreographed with Richard Osborne. 

I like mind-maps and think they particularly lend themselves to presenting the non-linear progression of ideas and activities in the creative process. Here is a partial picture of early research, ideas and activities for Test which I choreographed with Richard Osborne. 

(Source: hamishmacpherson)

Drumming floor plan using golden spirals. (1998) Anne Teresa Keersmaeker

Drumming floor plan using golden spirals. (1998) Anne Teresa Keersmaeker

(Source: hamishmacpherson)

Untitled (choreographic sketch by by Trisha Brown, 1975)

Untitled (choreographic sketch by by Trisha Brown, 1975)

Untitled (choreographic sketch by Trisha Brown, 1980)

Untitled (choreographic sketch by Trisha Brown, 1980)

"Brain, Dance and Culture: Dance is created by the embodied brain, influenced by culture and shaped and inspired by our relationship to and our perception of the environment."
From Mason and Paul Howard’s 'Brain, Dance and Culture: The choreographer, the dancing scientist and interdisciplinary collaboration' in Brolga: An Australian Journal About Dance; Jun 2009, Issue 30, p27-34

"Brain, Dance and Culture: Dance is created by the embodied brain, influenced by culture and shaped and inspired by our relationship to and our perception of the environment."

From Mason and Paul Howard’s 'Brain, Dance and Culture: The choreographer, the dancing scientist and interdisciplinary collaboration' in Brolga: An Australian Journal About Dance; Jun 2009, Issue 30, p27-34

"The relationship between improvisation and choreography. Improvisation is represented as the downwards pointing triangle that narrows as the triangle of choreography expands. In theory, an infinite amount of movement possibilities generated through improvisation are degenerated into the finite world of a choreographed performance."
From Mason and Paul Howard’s 'Brain, Dance and Culture: The choreographer, the dancing scientist and interdisciplinary collaboration' in Brolga: An Australian Journal About Dance; Jun 2009, Issue 30, p27-34

"The relationship between improvisation and choreography. Improvisation is represented as the downwards pointing triangle that narrows as the triangle of choreography expands. In theory, an infinite amount of movement possibilities generated through improvisation are degenerated into the finite world of a choreographed performance."

From Mason and Paul Howard’s 'Brain, Dance and Culture: The choreographer, the dancing scientist and interdisciplinary collaboration' in Brolga: An Australian Journal About Dance; Jun 2009, Issue 30, p27-34

From Performance Theory by Richard Schechner (1977)

From Performance Theory by Richard Schechner (1977)

A score for On the Edge of a Leaf.
The dimensions of a dancer (2011) by Hamish MacPherson. I’m not sure I subscribe to this any more, if I ever did. I think it was more or a thinking tool and the the diagonal passage (at the two o’clock position) is an attempt to connect everything to everything.

The dimensions of a dancer (2011) by Hamish MacPherson. I’m not sure I subscribe to this any more, if I ever did. I think it was more or a thinking tool and the the diagonal passage (at the two o’clock position) is an attempt to connect everything to everything.

A choreographic score for my piece Backwardist. The arrows show possible/preferred  pathways between movement sections.

A choreographic score for my piece Backwardist. The arrows show possible/preferred  pathways between movement sections.

Not specifically about choreography but elegant and relevant - the basic elements of creativity: copy, transform, combine. Via explore-blog

Not specifically about choreography but elegant and relevant - the basic elements of creativity: copy, transform, combine. Via explore-blog

(Source: explore-blog, via hamishmacpherson)

Siobhan Davies Dance’s ROTOR, is an ensemble of performances, sound, installations and artworks. 

A new dance work by Siobhan Davies was filmed from above and its patterns created a score for the nine artists. Distinct elements of The Score triggered new work which responded not only to the images from the dance but also to the energies, counterpoints or character developed by the dancers actions.

This image from the cover of the ROTOR catalogue plots the pathways of the four dancers.

Siobhan Davies Dance’s ROTOR, is an ensemble of performances, sound, installations and artworks. 

A new dance work by Siobhan Davies was filmed from above and its patterns created a score for the nine artists. Distinct elements of The Score triggered new work which responded not only to the images from the dance but also to the energies, counterpoints or character developed by the dancers actions.

This image from the cover of the ROTOR catalogue plots the pathways of the four dancers.

Something I produced in Choreography: Experiencing Space, Time and Ideas, a workshop  Lucy Cash for the Tate and Siobhan Davies Studios, this practice-based, six-week course combined physical movement and critical thinking. 
Through the choreographic lens, we explored art works at Tate, as well as everyday life. One of the things we covered waConnecting movement to mark making and leaving behind traces, both visible and invisible. Drawing on examples from the Tate Collection and an exhibition of work by Gabriel Orozco.

Something I produced in Choreography: Experiencing Space, Time and Ideas, a workshop  Lucy Cash for the Tate and Siobhan Davies Studios, this practice-based, six-week course combined physical movement and critical thinking. 

Through the choreographic lens, we explored art works at Tate, as well as everyday life. One of the things we covered waConnecting movement to mark making and leaving behind traces, both visible and invisible. Drawing on examples from the Tate Collection and an exhibition of work by Gabriel Orozco.

I like mind-maps and think they particularly lend themselves to presenting the non-linear progression of ideas and activities in the creative process. Here is a partial picture of early research, ideas and activities for Test which I choreographed with Richard Osborne. 

I like mind-maps and think they particularly lend themselves to presenting the non-linear progression of ideas and activities in the creative process. Here is a partial picture of early research, ideas and activities for Test which I choreographed with Richard Osborne. 

(Source: hamishmacpherson)

Drumming floor plan using golden spirals. (1998) Anne Teresa Keersmaeker

Drumming floor plan using golden spirals. (1998) Anne Teresa Keersmaeker

(Source: hamishmacpherson)

Untitled (choreographic sketch by by Trisha Brown, 1975)

Untitled (choreographic sketch by by Trisha Brown, 1975)

Untitled (choreographic sketch by Trisha Brown, 1980)

Untitled (choreographic sketch by Trisha Brown, 1980)

About:

I am Hamish MacPherson and this is my collection of ways that people use diagrams or visualisations when making or watching dance. This includes choreographic scores, thinking and explanatory tools and anything else that isn't simply writing or an illustration.

I would love to include your choreographics on this site - please email them to me at macpherson [dot] hamish [at] gmail [dot] com

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